Tag Archive for intolerance

The Kids Aren’t All Right: Part 1–What We’re Up Against

Lord, save our children.

 

When did it become not OK for kids to be kids?  There is hardly a child now that by the age of 14 hasn’t either cut themselves, questioned their sexuality or rejected God.  Anyone that tries to lead them to Truth is labeled intolerant, hateful, an ignorant bigot, or worse.

 

We are even accused of trying to indoctrinate our own children, but only because our parenting gets in the way of the attempts at indoctrination by our accusers.  And they want to call US hypocrites!

 

How fortunate then, that God already has a plan for these people.  He will have the last word, as he told His prophet Isaiah:

 

  I stop the highbrow intellectuals in their tracks,
and I show the fault of their reasoning.
  But I stand behind the words of My servants,
and I accomplish what they predict.
  (Isaiah 44:25b-26a VOICE)

 

We must endure.  As righteous as our anger may be toward our antagonists, we must remember these things:

 

  1. In our anger, we must not sin.(Ephesians 4:26)
  2. Vengeance is the Lord’s not ours.  (Romans 12:19)
  3. We do have a real enemy, but it is not a human enemy (2 Thessalonians 3:15, 1 Peter 5:8)

 

Our job is to spread the Gospel.  We can’t praise the name of Jesus and sully it at the same time.  If we take our eyes off of Jesus and start worrying about what other people are doing, then we lose sight of our mission.  As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote in his book, Strength to Love:

 

The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral,
begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy.
Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it.
Through violence, you may murder the liar,
but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth.
Through violence, you may murder the hater,
but you do not murder hate.
In fact, violence merely increases hate.
So it goes.
Returning violence for violence multiplies violence,
adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.
Darkness cannot drive out darkness:
only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.

 

Our job is to bring the light of Jesus to a darkened world that does not know it is in darkness.

 

We shouldn’t be surprised when we encounter opposition to the Truth.  This has been going on since day one.  Jesus was crucified, the apostles were persecuted and martyred, and on and on through the centuries.  There may soon come a day when preaching the word of God becomes illegal in this country, as it is in many communist and Muslim countries.

 

But here’s the thing.  Even if they put us in prison, God’s word can not be bound.  As Paul wrote in his second letter to Timothy:

 

Remember always, as the centre of everything, Jesus Christ, a man of human ancestry, yet raised by God from the dead according to my Gospel.  For preaching this I am having to endure being chained in prison as if I were some sort of a criminal.  But they cannot chain the Word of God, and I can endure all these things for the sake of those whom God is calling, so that they too may receive the salvation of Jesus Christ, and its complement of glory after the world of time.  (2 Timothy 2: 8-10 PHILLIPS)

 

We are called to persevere under trial and not to give up.  Even if we get tired and weak, God won’t.  So if we trust Him to carry us when we can’t go on, He will be faithful to do it.

 

We must stand firm, not only for our children’s sake, but also for our own.  Will you join me in praying for our youth today to be Truthseekers and not herd followers?

 

Intolerance: Part 4–Our God is a Jealous God

To appreciate fully Jesus’ righteous intolerance of sin, we must remember that He is one with God the Father, who describes Himself repeatedly as a “jealous God” (Exodus 20:5, 34:14; Deuteronomy 4:24, 5:9, 6:15; 32:16, 21; Joshua 24:19, Nahum 1:2, Zechariah 1:14).   

 

Unfortunately, many have taken offense to the word “jealous,” due to a misapprehension of its true meaning.

 

To be jealous is simply to advance one’s rights to the exclusion of the rights of others, or to put it another way, to be intolerant of any rivalry or unfaithfulness.

 

For example, a husband has exclusive rights to his wife.  If another man tries to encroach upon the husband’s marital rights, then the husband is jealous, not of his wife, but for his marriage. 

 

In the same way, but to an infinitely greater degree, God is jealous for His church. For God to be jealous signifies the advancement of His glory over anything that we would substitute for it.  This would include not only literal idols and false gods, but also the figurative idolatry shown by our elevating anything that is not God above God. 

 

He has made us, and we are His.  As such, it is His everlasting right to have our unending devotion, worship and praise.  Nothing else, and no one else, has a right to these. 

 

As Christians, we acknowledge God as God, and accordingly, we recognize Jesus as Lord.  Because of our submission to Jesus as the Lord of our lives, we also share in His righteous intolerance of sin. 

 

This presents a problem, though, since those who accuse the Church of being intolerant are those who have NOT recognized God as God or Jesus as Lord. 

 

If they recognize neither God’s authority nor Jesus’ divinity, then consequently, they will not recognize the church’s intolerance as being righteous.  A person whose gods are “logic and reason” will not concede that Jesus was anything but a great teacher at best. 

 

Fortunately, C. S. Lewis has already cleared this matter up for us:

 

A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher.  He would either be a lunatic—on a level with the man who says he is a poached egg—or else he would be the Devil of Hell.  You must make your choice.  Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse.  You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon; or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and God.  But let us not come with any patronising nonsense about His being a great human teacher.  He has not left that open to us.  He did not intend to.  (Lewis, C. S. Mere Christianity. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1952.)

 

As Lewis makes plain, true logic and reason will lead only to one conclusion for a Christian.  That is the same conclusion that their hearts have already led them to—Jesus’ lordship.

 

(OK, so now what?  Come back for the conclusion: Part 5–The Narrow Path)

 

Intolerance: Part 3–Righteous

 

Since no one can measure up to the standard of God by his or her own efforts, it is therefore senseless to expect anyone else to measure up to our own standards.  

 

We are in no position to judge the nature, or character, of another, because we share the same sinful character.  To attempt to judge someone in this way would make us guilty of self-righteous intolerance. 

 

However, there is such a thing as righteous intolerance.  This cannot come from any person’s will or way of thinking, as Solomon wrote, “There is not a righteous man on earth who does what is right and never sins”  (Ecclesiastes 7:20 NIV). 

 

The only possible source of righteous intolerance is the only person who never sinned–Jesus.

 

One of the central tenets of Christianity is that Jesus is not just the only begotten Son of God, but is in very nature God Himself (see Philippians 2:6).

 

Being God in His nature, Jesus visibly displayed all of the invisible attributes of God’s goodness.  Being all good, He is diametrically opposed in His nature to all evil.  Therefore, Jesus is opposed to intolerance—the self-righteous intolerance toward people.

 

John 3:17 tells us that Jesus did not come into the world to condemn it, but to save it.  This was not because we deserved saving, but because He is good.  This is the essence of grace, which is the ultimate expression of tolerance. 

 

Throughout the Gospels, Jesus shows his tolerance of people by showing mercy and grace toward sinners, even the very ones who put him to death. 

 

However, it cannot be disregarded that while Jesus was a friend of sinners, He was never tolerant of sin.  In the Sermon on the Mount, He uses over-the-top imagery to illustrate his intolerance for evil behavior:

 

“If your right eye causes you to sin, gouge it out and throw it away.  It is better for you to lose one part of your body than for your whole body to be thrown into hell.  And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away.  It is better for you to lose one part of your body than for your whole body to go into hell.” (Matthew 5:29-30 NIV)

 

One of the most common Bible verses to be quoted out of context by non-Christians (usually in attempts to self-righteously justify sinful behavior) is John 8:7.  The religious leaders are preparing to stone a woman caught in the act of adultery. In response, Jesus is quoted as saying, “He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her (KJV).”

 

Although this passage does not appear in original manuscripts, and therefore may not have actually happened, the point of the story remains clear:  because we are all sinners, no other person is qualified to cast a stone at us. 

 

Nevertheless, though none of us are righteous, we must remember that we will all be judged one day by the One who is. 

 

This is why, after showing mercy to the woman caught in adultery, He admonishes her (and us) to “go, and sin no more (John 8:11b KJV).

 

(Stay tuned for Part 4–Our God is a Jealous God)

           

Intolerance: Part 1–Listen!

 

Christianity has recently seen a rising number of attacks, from within the church as well as without, regarding its “intolerance.”

So is the Christian church intolerant? And if so, is that really such a bad thing?

We can better understand intolerance by first defining “tolerance” itself. One implication of tolerance might be to listen patiently to another’s ideas that differ from our own, while postponing criticism or judgment.

A reasonable definition of intolerance, then, would be the opposite—disagreeing without listening, judging without understanding, rejecting another’s view out of hand, or to sum it up in a single word—condemning.

So is that what the Christian church is? Condemning? Am I actually implying that it might be a positive thing for the church to behave that way toward people outside of it? Not in the least!

Of course, Christians, and everyone else, should be tolerant of other people. We are aware that many do not believe what we believe, or know what we know about Jesus and the Bible. The most effective method of reaching someone with different beliefs or opinions is, as Stephen Covey put it, to “seek first to understand, then to be understood.” (Covey, Stephen R. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Free Press, 1989.)

In other words, we must LISTEN, not just wait for our turn to talk. Our primary motive should never be to tell people why they are wrong, but rather to listen to their story. This active, empathic listening demonstrates tolerance.

However, there is a second part to this principle. We seek first to understand, but THEN we also seek to be understood. That means telling our side of the story. If we have treated someone with tolerance by actively listening, should we not expect the same courtesy in return?

Yet this is exactly the same courtesy that is NOT being returned to the church by antitheists and renegade theologians alike. They impetuously lump us into the political category of “the Christian Radical Right” and call us “demagogues” or much worse, because we defend our “interpretation of the Bible” as truth.

In other words, either they have judged the Bible without reading it, or if they have read it, they have dismissed it out of hand without trying to understand it or those who revere it, regard it as authoritative and follow its teachings.

In other words, by definition, they are being intolerant. Because Christians do not share their opinions or beliefs, we are seen by them as morons at best and likely dangerous.

The irony is that they never look at themselves with the same lens in which they view the world. True tolerance requires humility. It is impossible to listen tolerantly to another’s point of view without first humbly acknowledging the merit of the need of the other to be heard.

To indict someone of being intolerant by exhibiting the very intolerance you deplore is hypocrisy.

 

(Did I lose anybody? If not, please come back for Part 2–Good and Evil)